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Items Tagged: cloud+backup

news / Blog

Zmanda’s Amanda Enterprise now supports Google’s Cloud Storage APIs

Amanda Enterprise, Zmanda’s flagship enterprise-class cloud backup solution that has supported the Amazon Cloud Storage API for the last 2 – 3 years is now integrated with Google’s Cloud Storage’s open RESTful API. Zmanda’s code is engineered to support other REST-based APIs.

  • Premiered: 03/09/12
  • Author: Taneja Group
  • Published: Taneja Blog
Topic(s): Zmanda Zmanda Recovery Manager ZRM Amanda Enterprise cloud backup ZCB
news / Blog

Quantum introduces cloud-powered data protection

Quantum announced its foray into cloud-powered data protection to complement the company's existing on-premise data protection portfolio, which includes DXi-Series disk backup and deduplication, vmPRO virtual machine protection and Scalar tape automation products. For a company delivering effective and efficient premise-based data protection for a while, the cloud-based data protection is the logical next step.

  • Premiered: 03/26/12
  • Author: Taneja Group
  • Published: Taneja Blog
Topic(s): Quantum DXi v1000 Xerox cloud backup DR Disaster Recovery
Profiles/Reports

Tape Libraries: Why, When and Where?

A technology publication that shall go unnamed posted the news last year that Amazon Glacier was a “tape-killing cloud” and that it would “devastate the [tape] industry.”

Not exactly. We do believe that smaller tape implementations are going the way of the dodo bird. Cloud backup is quickly replacing small standalone tape drives and autoloaders for daily backup, and as low-end tape equipment ages IT replaces it with cloud for long-term backup retention.

However, tape housed in mid-sized and enterprise scale libraries are growing strongly in several high-value computing and industry segments. Thus the question for IT becomes not “Should I use tape?” but “When should I invest in tape libraries?”

Publish date: 07/31/13
Profiles/Reports

Business Continuity Best Practices for SMB

Virtualization’s biggest driver is big savings: slashing expenditures on servers, licenses, management, and energy. Another major benefit is the increased ease of disaster recovery and business continuity (DR/BC) in virtualized environments.

Note that disaster recovery and business continuity are closely aligned but not identical. We define disaster recovery as the process of restoring lost data, applications and systems following a profound data loss event, such as a natural disaster, a deliberate data breach or employee negligence. Business continuity takes DR a step further. BC’s goal is not only to recover the computing environment but also to recover them swiftly and with zero data loss. This is where recovery point objectives (RPO) and recovery time objectives (RTO) enter the picture, with IT assigning differing RPO and RTO strategies according to application priority.

DR/BC can be difficult to do well in data centers with traditional physical servers, particularly in SMB with limited IT budgets and generalist IT staff. Many of these servers are siloed with direct-attached storage and individual data protection processes. Mirroring and replication used to require one-to-one hardware correspondence and can be expensive, leading to a universal reliance on localized backup as data protection. In addition, small IT staffs do not always take the time to perfect their backup processes across disparate servers. Either they do not do it at all –rolling the dice and hoping there won’t be a disaster – or they slap backups on tape or USB drives and stick them on a shelf.

Virtualization can transform this environment into a much more efficient and protected data center. Backing up VMs from a handful of host servers is faster and less resource-intensive than backing up tens or hundreds of physical servers. And with scheduled replication, companies achieve faster backup and much improved recovery objectives.

However, many SMBs avoid virtualization. They cite factors such as cost, unfamiliarity with hypervisors, and added complexity. And they are not wrong: virtualization can introduce complexity, it can be expensive, and it can require familiarity with hypervisors. Virtualization cuts down on physical servers but is resource-intensive, especially as the virtualized environment grows. This means capital costs for high performance CPUs and storage. SMBs may also have to deal VM licensing and management costs, administrative burdens, and the challenge of protecting and replicating virtualized data on a strict budget.

For all its complexity and learning curve, is virtualization worth it for SMBs? Definitely. Its benefits far outweigh its problems, particularly its advantages for DR/BC. But for many SMBs, traditional virtualization is often too expensive and complex to warrant the effort. We believe that the answer is HyperConverged Infrastructure: HCI. Of HCI providers, Scale Computing is exceptionally attractive to the SMB. This paper will explain why. 

Publish date: 09/30/15
news

Data protection vendors fight for cloud storage title

Though major cloud storage service providers like AWS, Azure and Google lead on price, they may be lacking for data protection services.

  • Premiered: 03/07/16
  • Author: Jim Whalen
  • Published: TechTarget: Search Cloud Storage
Topic(s): TBA Data protection TBA Cloud TBA Cloud Storage TBA Jim Whalen TBA Amazon AWS TBA AWS TBA Azure TBA Google TBA Microsoft TBA Amazon TBA Disaster Recovery TBA DR TBA Backup TBA backup appliance TBA hyperscale TBA DP TBA Archiving TBA replication TBA cloud backup TBA Virtual Machine TBA VM TBA RTO TBA Datto TBA Unitrends
news

Iron Mountain Cloud Archive returns vendor to cloud storage

Iron Mountain was one of the first players in cloud storage, but exited the market early on. Now, it's back with a resurrected archive service based on EMC's ECS.

  • Premiered: 05/12/16
  • Author: Taneja Group
  • Published: TechTarget: Search Cloud Storage
Topic(s): TBA Iron Mountain TBA Cloud TBA cloud archive TBA Cloud Storage TBA Storage TBA EMC TBA ECS TBA elastic cloud TBA Virtual File Store TBA Archive Service Platform TBA S3 TBA Amazon TBA API TBA OpenStack TBA OpenStack Swift TBA EMC Atmos TBA Nasuni TBA Panzura TBA Seven10 TBA CTERA TBA CloudBoost TBA CloudArray TBA Isilon TBA CloudPool TBA Datacenter TBA SLA TBA compliance TBA Security TBA cloud backup TBA cloud data migration
Profiles/Reports

HPE Brings Multi-Cloud Storage to the Enterprise

Companies in every industry and from every corner of the world are increasingly adopting cloud storage, addressing use cases such as backup, archiving and disaster recovery. More than 96% of organizations we recently surveyed are housing at least some of their data in the cloud, up from just 65% five years before. Firms deploying storage in the cloud are looking to increase IT agility and workload scalability, while taking advantage of a more flexible, pay-as-you-go consumption model.

But for enterprises and mid-sized organizations alike, the cloud journey nearly always starts on premises. A large majority of organizations still run the core of their business-critical workloads in the data center, supported by significant and proven investments in on-premises hardware, workflows and business processes that support key business apps and ensure maximum value to users and other stakeholders. Not surprisingly, IT decision makers tread carefully when it comes to considering public cloud deployments for their critical apps or data.

To get the best of the cloud without compromising current IT investments, a growing majority of decision makers are now focusing on solutions with hybrid and multicloud capabilities. Hybrid cloud enables them to gain value from the cloud from day 1, while fully leveraging their on-prem infrastructure. Under a hybrid model, companies can deploy selected apps that make sense to run in the public cloud, but still run a majority of their core business workloads on-premises. They can also employ a dev-ops approach to begin to develop and run cloud-native apps.

Multicloud takes those benefits one step further, enabling portability of workloads between two or more clouds. Organizations we surveyed are now working with at least two major public cloud providers, on average, enabling them to avoid lock-in to a single provider and to choose the provider that best meets the needs of each app and use case. Together, hybrid and multicloud offer an attractive and measured approach for companies looking to deploy some of their workloads in the cloud.

In this piece we’ll examine the customer journey to cloud storage, including some important considerations companies should keep in mind as they decide what approach will work best for them. We’ll then describe HPE’s storage platforms, which are built for cloud and provide a powerful and unique approach to multicloud storage. Finally, we’ll look at the advantages that HPE storage delivers over other cloud storage deployment models, and show how these HPE platforms are helping enterprises to maximize the potential of their cloud storage initiatives.

Publish date: 09/21/18