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Items Tagged: Sun

Profiles/Reports

Information Lifecycle Management: Why Bother? - Published Article

Information lifecycle management may be the holy grail of the storage industry, but today it remains little more than a marketing push to sell storage hardware.

 

Publish date: 02/01/05
Profiles/Reports

Enterprise Flash - Scalable, Smart, and Economical

There is a serious re-hosting effort going on in data center storage as flash-filled systems replace large arrays of older spinning disks for tier 1 apps. Naturally as costs drop and the performance advantages of flash-accelerated IO services become irresistible, they also begin pulling in a widening circle of applications with varying QoS needs. Yet this extension leads to a wasteful tug-of-war between high-end flash only systems that can’t effectively serve a wide variety of application workloads and so-called hybrid solutions originally architected for HDDs that are often challenged to provide the highest performance required by those tier 1 applications.

Someday in its purest form all-flash storage theoretically could drop in price enough to outright replace all other storage tiers even at the largest capacities, although that is certainly not true today. Here at Taneja Group we think storage tiering will always offer a better way to deliver varying levels of QoS by balancing the latest in performance advances appropriately with the most efficient capacities. In any case, the best enterprise storage solutions today need to offer a range of storage tiers, often even when catering to a single application’s varying storage needs.

There are many entrants in the flash storage market, with the big vendors now rolling out enterprise solutions upgraded for flash. Unfortunately many of these systems are shallow retreads of older architectures, perhaps souped-up a bit to better handle some hybrid flash acceleration but not able to take full advantage of it. Or they are new dedicated flash-only point products with big price tags, immature or minimal data services, and limited ability to scale out or serve a wider set of data center QoS needs.

Oracle saw an opportunity for a new type of cost-effective flash-speed storage system that could meet the varied QoS needs of multiple enterprise data center applications – in other words, to take flash storage into the mainstream of the data center. Oracle decided they had enough storage chops (from Exadata, ZFS, Pillar, Sun, etc.) to design and build a “flash-first” enterprise system intended to take full advantage of flash as a performance tier, but also incorporate other storage tiers naturally including slower “capacity” flash, performance HDD, and capacity HDD. Tiering by itself isn’t a new thing – all the hybrid solutions do it and there are other vendor solutions that were designed for tiering – but Oracle built the FS1 Flash Storage System from the fast “flash” tier down, not by adding flash to a slower or existing HDD-based architecture working “upwards.” This required designing intelligent automated management to take advantage of flash for performance while leveraging HDD to balance out cost. This new architecture has internal communication links dedicated to flash media with separate IO paths for HDDs, unlike traditional hybrids that might rely solely on their older, standard HDD-era architectures that can internally constrain high-performance flash access.

Oracle FS1 is a highly engineered SAN storage system with key capabilities that set it apart from other all-flash storage systems, including built in QoS management that incorporates business priorities, best-practices provisioning, and a storage alignment capability that is application aware – for Oracle Database naturally, but that can also address a growing body of other key enterprise applications (such as Oracle JD Edwards, PeopleSoft, Siebel, MS Exchange/SQL Server, and SAP) – and a “service provider” capability to carve out multi-tenant virtual storage “domains” while online that are actually enforced at the hardware partitioning level for top data security isolation.

In this report, we’ll dive in and examine some of the great new capabilities of the Oracle FS1. We’ll look at what really sets it apart from the competition in terms of its QoS, auto-tiering, co-engineering with Oracle Database and applications, delivered performance, capacity scaling and optimization, enterprise availability, and OPEX reducing features, all at a competitive price point that will challenge the rest of the increasingly flash-centric market.

Publish date: 02/02/15
news / Blog

What NetApp's Acquisition of SolidFire Means

Last month NetApp acquired SolidFire for $870M. It is by far the biggest acquisition in NetApp’s history.

news

Enterprise cloud storage boosted by Oracle Cloud Converged Storage

Hybrid cloud storage systems sound great in theory. So why has it taken vendors so long to produce one that's actually 'hybrid'?

  • Premiered: 05/04/17
  • Author: Mike Matchett
  • Published: TechTarget: Search Oracle
Topic(s): TBA Mike Matchett TBA Hybrid Cloud TBA Hybrid Cloud Storage TBA HCS TBA Storage TBA Hybrid TBA Cloud Storage TBA enterprise cloud TBA cloud infrastructure TBA Public Cloud TBA Cloud TBA Oracle TBA Oracle ZFS TBA cloud converged storage TBA converged storage TBA converged TBA convergence TBA IBM TBA Dell EMC TBA NetApp TBA cloud gateway TBA Attunity TBA CloudBeam TBA Sun Microsystems TBA Sun TBA NAS TBA High Performance