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Items Tagged: Storage+Tiering

news / Blog

Dell’s New Hybrid Arrays in Action, on a Cruise Ship near You

Carnival was in need of storage that could not only handle today’s demands, but could scale quickly…and inexpensively.

  • Premiered: 11/09/10
  • Author: Taneja Group
Topic(s): Dell EqualLogic Hybrid Array SSD Storage Tiering
news / Blog

VMware VAAI: Clumsy Acronym, Great Strategy

With the announcement of VMware vSphere 4.1, I think VMware's set the bar very high, again.

  • Premiered: 07/13/10
  • Author: Taneja Group
Topic(s): 3PAR Bartoletti Dell Storage Performance Storage Tiering VAAI Virtualization VMWare vSphere
Profiles/Reports

Maximizing Database Performance With Dell Equallogic Hybrid Arrays

Today’s combination of rapidly-accelerating demand for data and rapidly-consolidating datacenter infrastructure makes choosing the right storage for each of your business applications more important—and more difficult—than ever. In our view, it’s time more of this burden is taken on by the SAN itself. In other words, it’s time for more SAN intelligence. The intelligent SAN should optimize all available storage resources—automatically. In this profile explore how dynamic, multi-tiered OLTP workloads test the limits of traditional manual storage tiering strategies, and further strengthen the case for automated tiering on the SAN itself. Then we review Dell’s internal benchmark test results and speak to Carnival Cruise Lines, an EqualLogic customer, in order to evaluate how Dell’s hybrid SSD/SAS arrays are delivering higher performance and lower overhead both in the lab and in the field.

Publish date: 05/23/11
Resources

Tiering storage primer: Data classification, archiving key

Tiering storage can be a challenge. Data must be classified into the right storage tiers, and it’s not always clear what data should go where. IT managers must also comb through several different types of storage tiering, such as automated storage tiering, dynamic storage tiering and sub-LUN tiering. Although tools (such as data migration tools) exist to help users tier their storage, they can often be complicated to use.

  • Premiered: 07/22/11 at OnDemand
  • Location: OnDemand
  • Speaker(s): Taneja Group
  • Sponsor(s): TechTarget: SearchStorage.com
Topic(s): TBA Topic(s): Archiving Topic(s): TBA Topic(s): tiering Topic(s): TBA Topic(s): Storage Tiering Topic(s): TBA Topic(s): Data Classification
news

Automatic storage tiering making its mark

When solid-state drives (SSDs) first started showing up in storage arrays three years ago, the lack of automatic storage tiering was cited as one of the major barriers to deployment -- along with cost. SSDs are still far from ubiquitous in storage arrays, but you can no longer blame a lack of automated tiering options for that.

  • Premiered: 09/07/11
  • Author: Taneja Group
  • Published: TechTarget: SearchStorage.com
Topic(s): TBA Storage Tiering TBA Automatic Storage TBA SSD
Profiles/Reports

The case for Intelligent Storage (Dell)

In the past decade, a volatile business climate and a dynamic technology landscape have combined to raise the pressures on the enterprise datacenter, and especially on the storage infrastructure that underlies it. The need to adapt to such constantly-shifting demands and technology developments has sorely tested the limits of existing networked storage solutions. The virtualization mega-trend has dramatically changed the way information is sized, controlled, and protected. But traditional networked storage solutions are too often rigid, complex, and inefficient. Taneja Group has identified a way forward. We have collected the essential elements of the storage solutions needed for today’s new IT realities under the term “intelligent storage.” In this profile, we define what we mean by storage intelligence, whether that storage is file or block, and whether its architecture is SAN, NAS, or unified. We then examine how Dell is delivering this intelligence with its EqualLogic storage line. Wherever you are in your datacenter evolution, we think it’s time to examine whether your storage has the intelligence to carry you to your end goals.

Publish date: 10/04/11
Profiles/Reports

Dell Compellent: Fluid Storage for a Virtualized World

The enterprise datacenter was a very different place just a few years ago. Over the last decade, several macro trends have converged: rapid server consolidation enabled by virtualization, dramatic data proliferation and the rise of “big data,” solid-state drive technology advances, and an increasingly mobile and demanding workforce. In short, IT continues to consolidate, while business becomes more distributed. This tension drives the search for greater efficiency now at the heart of every IT decision. And no-where is this pressure felt more acutely than in the storage layer. Virtualized and consolidated work-loads create new types of storage I/O contention, which are costly to troubleshoot and repair. Storage costs continue to rise because capacity planning is harder in today’s dynamic business environment. Over time, performance limitations, wasted capacity, and complex operations eat into the bottom line and increase lifetime storage TCO. These realities drive the need for more intelligence in the storage layer. In this technology brief, we explore the ways in which Dell Compellent’s Storage Center is delivering such intelligence today.

Publish date: 12/08/11
Profiles/Reports

Dell Equallogic FS7500: Unified Storage Simplifies File Sharing And Accelerates Virtualization

With the introduction of the FS7500 NAS appliance for the EqualLogic PS Series, Dell customers now have a unified storage option to further reduce management overhead and improve efficiency. All too often, companies have been forced to deploy different storage platforms for different needs: NAS for file-based applications and user file shares and SAN for block-based applications and high-performance virtualized workloads. The FS7500 changes the game. Your unified storage solution should let you easily scale your file shares to handle today’s tremendous growth in unstructured data. It should also accelerate and simplify your virtualization efforts by giving you the freedom to choose the best storage protocol for each virtual workload based on your unique application requirements, skill sets, and existing storage investments. In this technology brief, we explore how Dell’s customers can benefit from the addition of scale-out NAS to the leading scale-out iSCSI SAN storage family.

Publish date: 01/30/12
Profiles/Reports

Enterprise Flash - Scalable, Smart, and Economical

There is a serious re-hosting effort going on in data center storage as flash-filled systems replace large arrays of older spinning disks for tier 1 apps. Naturally as costs drop and the performance advantages of flash-accelerated IO services become irresistible, they also begin pulling in a widening circle of applications with varying QoS needs. Yet this extension leads to a wasteful tug-of-war between high-end flash only systems that can’t effectively serve a wide variety of application workloads and so-called hybrid solutions originally architected for HDDs that are often challenged to provide the highest performance required by those tier 1 applications.

Someday in its purest form all-flash storage theoretically could drop in price enough to outright replace all other storage tiers even at the largest capacities, although that is certainly not true today. Here at Taneja Group we think storage tiering will always offer a better way to deliver varying levels of QoS by balancing the latest in performance advances appropriately with the most efficient capacities. In any case, the best enterprise storage solutions today need to offer a range of storage tiers, often even when catering to a single application’s varying storage needs.

There are many entrants in the flash storage market, with the big vendors now rolling out enterprise solutions upgraded for flash. Unfortunately many of these systems are shallow retreads of older architectures, perhaps souped-up a bit to better handle some hybrid flash acceleration but not able to take full advantage of it. Or they are new dedicated flash-only point products with big price tags, immature or minimal data services, and limited ability to scale out or serve a wider set of data center QoS needs.

Oracle saw an opportunity for a new type of cost-effective flash-speed storage system that could meet the varied QoS needs of multiple enterprise data center applications – in other words, to take flash storage into the mainstream of the data center. Oracle decided they had enough storage chops (from Exadata, ZFS, Pillar, Sun, etc.) to design and build a “flash-first” enterprise system intended to take full advantage of flash as a performance tier, but also incorporate other storage tiers naturally including slower “capacity” flash, performance HDD, and capacity HDD. Tiering by itself isn’t a new thing – all the hybrid solutions do it and there are other vendor solutions that were designed for tiering – but Oracle built the FS1 Flash Storage System from the fast “flash” tier down, not by adding flash to a slower or existing HDD-based architecture working “upwards.” This required designing intelligent automated management to take advantage of flash for performance while leveraging HDD to balance out cost. This new architecture has internal communication links dedicated to flash media with separate IO paths for HDDs, unlike traditional hybrids that might rely solely on their older, standard HDD-era architectures that can internally constrain high-performance flash access.

Oracle FS1 is a highly engineered SAN storage system with key capabilities that set it apart from other all-flash storage systems, including built in QoS management that incorporates business priorities, best-practices provisioning, and a storage alignment capability that is application aware – for Oracle Database naturally, but that can also address a growing body of other key enterprise applications (such as Oracle JD Edwards, PeopleSoft, Siebel, MS Exchange/SQL Server, and SAP) – and a “service provider” capability to carve out multi-tenant virtual storage “domains” while online that are actually enforced at the hardware partitioning level for top data security isolation.

In this report, we’ll dive in and examine some of the great new capabilities of the Oracle FS1. We’ll look at what really sets it apart from the competition in terms of its QoS, auto-tiering, co-engineering with Oracle Database and applications, delivered performance, capacity scaling and optimization, enterprise availability, and OPEX reducing features, all at a competitive price point that will challenge the rest of the increasingly flash-centric market.

Publish date: 02/02/15
Profiles/Reports

HPE StoreVirtual 3200: A Look at the Only Entry Array with Scale-out and Scale-up

Innovation in traditional external storage has recently taken a back seat to the current market darlings of All Flash Arrays and Software-defined Scale-out Storage. Can there be a better way to redesign the mainstream dual-controller array that has been a popular choice for entry-level shared storage for the last 20 years?  Hewlett-Packard Enterprise (HPE) claims the answer is a resounding Yes.

HPE StoreVirtual 3200 (SV3200) is a new entry storage device that leverages HPE’s StoreVirtual Software-defined Storage (SDS) technology combined with an innovative use of low-cost ARM-based controller technology found in high-end smartphones and tablets. This approach allows HPE to leverage StoreVirtual technology to create an entry array that is more cost effective than using the same software on a set of commodity X86 servers. Optimizing the cost/performance ratio using ARM technology instead of excessive power hungry processing and memory using X86 computers unleashes an attractive SDS product unmatched in affordability. For the first time, an entry storage device can both Scale-up and Scale-out efficiently and also have the additional flexibility to be compatible with a full complement of hyper-converged and composable infrastructure (based on the same StoreVirtual technology). This unique capability gives businesses the ultimate flexibility and investment protection as they transition to a modern infrastructure based on software-defined technologies. The SV3200 is ideal for SMB on-premises storage and enterprise remote office deployments. In the future, it will also enable low-cost capacity expansion for HPE’s Hyper Converged and Composable infrastructure offerings.

Taneja Group evaluated the HPE SV3200 to validate the fit as an entry storage device. Ease-of-use, advanced data services, and supportability were just some of the key attributes we validated with hands-on testing. What we found was that the SV3200 is an extremely easy-to-use device that can be managed by IT generalists. This simplicity is good news for both new customers that cannot afford dedicated administrators and also for those HPE customers that are already accustomed to managing multiple HPE products that adhere to the same HPE OneView infrastructure management paradigm. We also validated that the advanced data services of this entry array match that of the field proven enterprise StoreVirtual products already in the market. The SV3200 can support advanced features such as linear scale-out and multi-site stretch cluster capability that enables advanced business continuity techniques rarely found in storage products of this class. What we found is that HPE has raised the bar for entry arrays, and we strongly recommend businesses that are looking at either SDS technology or entry storage strongly consider HPE’s SV3200 as a product that has the flexibility to provide the best of both. A starting price at under $10,000 makes it very affordable to start using this easy, powerful, and flexible array. Give it a closer look.

Publish date: 04/11/17
news

Storage technologies evolve toward a data-processing platform

Emerging technologies such as containers, HCI and big data have blurred the lines between compute and storage platforms, breaking down traditional IT silos.

  • Premiered: 05/18/17
  • Author: Mike Matchett
  • Published: TechTarget: Search Data Center
Topic(s): TBA Storage TBA Big Data TBA Compute TBA HCI TBA hyperconverged TBA hyperconvergence TBA hyperconverged infrastructure TBA container TBA Mike Matchett TBA SDS TBA software-defined TBA software-defined storage TBA Data Storage TBA scale-out TBA Availability TBA convergence TBA HPE TBA SimpliVity TBA Nutanix TBA Hybrid Cloud TBA Cloud TBA server-side flash TBA Flash TBA SSD TBA Datrium TBA DriveScale TBA Igneous TBA Hadoop TBA Spark TBA HDFS