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Items Tagged: HC3

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Scale Computing Launches HC3: Servers, Storage and Virtualization Seamlessly Integrated Into...

Scale Computing Launches HC3: Servers, Storage and Virtualization Seamlessly Integrated Into a Single Cluster for Applications Scale Computing, the leading provider of seamlessly integrated IT infrastructure for small to medium-sized organizations, today announced at VMworld 2012 the availability of HC3 - the easiest, most affordable virtualization system for midsize companies. With no virtualization software to license and no external storage to buy, HC3 lowers out of pocket costs by as much as 75 percent and radically simplifies the infrastructure needed to keep applications running. HC3 makes the deployment and management of a highly available and scalable infrastructure as easy to manage as a single server.

  • Premiered: 08/30/12
  • Author: Taneja Group
  • Published: Scale Computing
Topic(s): TBA Scale Computing TBA Virtualization TBA Servers TBA HC3
Profiles/Reports

Scale Computing HC3: A Second Look at a Hyperconverged Appliance

Consolidation and enhanced management enabled by virtualization has revolutionized the practice of IT around the world over the past few years. By abstracting compute from the underlying hardware systems, and enabling oversubscription of physical systems by virtual workloads, IT has been able to pack more systems into the data center than before. Moreover, for the first time in seemingly decades, IT has also taken a serious leap ahead in management, as this same virtual infrastructure has wrapped the virtualized workload with better capabilities than ever before - tools like increased visibility, fast provisioning, enhanced cloning, and better data protection. The net result has been a serious increase in overall IT efficiency.

But not all is love and roses with the virtual infrastructure. In the face of serious benefits and consequent rampant adoption, virtualization continues to advance and bring about more capability. All too often, an increase in capability has come at the cost of complexity. Virtualization now promises to do everything from serving up compute instances, to providing network infrastructure and network security, to enabling private clouds.

For certain, much of this complexity exists between the individual physical infrastructures that IT must touch, and the simultaneous duplication that virtualization often brings into the picture. Virtual and physical networks must now be integrated, the relationship between virtual and physical servers must be tracked, and the administrator can barely answer with certainty whether key storage functions, like snapshots, should be managed on physical storage systems or in the virtual infrastructure.

With challenges surrounding the complexity in managing a virtualized datacenter, Scale Computing, long a provider of scale-out storage, introduced a new line of hyperconverged appliances - HC3 in April, 2012 and updated the appliances with the new HyperCore software in May, 2014. HC3 is an integration of storage and virtualized compute within a scale-out building block architecture that couples all of the elements of a virtual data center together inside a hyperconverged appliance. The result is a system that is simple to use and does away with much of the complexity associated with virtualization in the data center. By virtualizing and intermingling compute and storage inside a system that is designed for scale-out, HC3 does away with the need to manage virtual networks, assemble complex compute clusters, provision and manage storage, and a bevy of other day to day administrative tasks. Provisioning additional resources - any resource - becomes one-click-easy, and adding more physical resources as the business grows is reduced to a simple 2-minute exercise.

While this sounds compelling on the surface, Taneja Group recently turned our Technology Validation service - our hands-on lab service - to the task of evaluating whether Scale Computing's HC3 could deliver on these promises in the real world. For this task, we put an HC3 cluster through the paces to see how well it deployed, how it held up under use, and what special features it delivered that might go beyond the features found in traditional integrations of discreet compute and storage systems.

Publish date: 09/30/14
Profiles/Reports

Scale Computing HC3 And VMware Virtual SAN Hyperconverged Solutions - Head to Head

Scale Computing was an early proponent of hyperconverged appliances and is one of the innovators in this marketplace. Since the release of Scale Computing’s first hyperconverged appliance, many others have come to embrace the elegance of having storage and compute functionality combined on a single server. Even the virtualization juggernaut VMware has seen the benefits of abstracting, pooling, and running storage and compute on shared commodity hardware. VMware’s current hyperconverged storage initiative, VMware Virtual SAN, seems to be gaining traction in the marketplace. We thought it would be an interesting exercise to compare and contrast Scale Computing’s hyperconverged appliance to a hyperconverged solution built around VMware Virtual SAN. Before we delve into this exercise, however, let’s go over a little background history on the topic.

Taneja Group defines hyperconvergence as the integration of multiple previously separate IT domains into one system in order to serve up an entire IT infrastructure from a single device or system. This means that hyperconverged systems contain all IT infrastructure—networking, compute and storage—while promising to preserve the adaptability of the best traditional IT approaches. Such capability implies an architecture built for seamless and easy scaling over time, in a "grow as needed” fashion.

Scale Computing got its start with scale-out storage appliances and has since morphed these into a hyperconverged appliance—HC3. HC3 was the natural evolution of its well-regarded line of scale-out storage appliances, which includes both a hypervisor and a virtual infrastructure manager. HC3’s strong suit is its ease of use and affordability. The product has seen tremendous growth and now has over 900 deployments.

VMware got its start with compute virtualization software and is by far the largest virtualization company in the world. VMware has always been a software company, and takes pride in its hardware agnosticism. VMware’s first attempt to combine shared direct-attached storage (DAS) storage and compute on the same server resulted in a product called “VMware vSphere Storage Appliance” (VSA), which was released in June of 2011. VSA had many limitations and didn’t seem to gain traction in the marketplace and reached its end of availability (EOA) in June of 2014. VMware’s second attempt, VMware Virtual SAN (VSAN), which was announced at VMworld in 2013, shows a lot of promise and seems to be gaining acceptance, with over 300 paying customers using the product. We will be comparing VMware Virtual SAN to Scale Computing’s hyperconverged appliance, HC3, in this paper.

Here we have two companies: Scale Computing, which has transformed from an early innovator in scale-out storage to a company that provides a hyperconverged appliance; and VMware, which was an early innovator in compute virtualization and since has transformed into a company that provides the software needed to create build-your-own hyperconverged systems. We looked deeply into both systems (HC3 and VSAN) and walked both through a series of exercises to see how they compare. We aimed this review at what we consider a sweet spot for these products: small to medium-sized enterprises with limited dedicated IT staff and a limited budget. After spending time with these two solutions, and probing various facets of them, we came up with some strong conclusions about their ability to provide an affordable, easy to use, scalable solution for this market.

The observations we have made for both products are based on hands-on testing both in our lab and on-site at Scale Computing’s facility in Indianapolis, Indiana. Although we talk about performance in general terms, we do not, and you should not, construe this to be a benchmarking test. We have, in good faith, verified all conclusions made around any timing issues. Moreover, the numbers that we are using are generalities that we believe are widely known and accepted in the virtualization community.

Publish date: 10/01/14
news

5 Tips for Working with the Scale Computing HC3 Hyperconvergence Appliance

Is this all-in-one virtualization box a good choice for an SMB?

  • Premiered: 10/28/14
  • Author: Taneja Group
  • Published: Virtualization Review
Topic(s): TBA Scale Computing TBA HC3 TBA hyperconverged TBA hyperconvergence TBA KVM TBA Hypervisor TBA VM TBA Virtual Machine TBA Virtualization TBA Storage TBA Performance TBA converged TBA convergence TBA Datacenter TBA Infrastructure TBA Infrastructure Performance
Profiles/Reports

Scale Computing Field Report

Virtualization is mature and widely adopted in the enterprise market, and convergence/hyperconvergence with virtualization is taking the market by storm. But what about mid-sized and SMB? Are they falling behind?

Many of them are. Generalist IT, low virtualization budgets, and small staff sizes all militate against complex virtualization projects and high costs. What this means is that when mid-sized and SMB want to virtualize, they either get sticker shock from high prices and high complexity, or dissatisfaction with cheap, poorly scalable and unreliable solutions. What they want and need is hyperconvergence for ease in management, lower CapEx and OpEx; and a simplified but highly scalable and available virtualization platform.

This is a tall order but not an impossible one: Scale Computing claims to meet these requirements for this large market segment, and Taneja Group’s HC3 Validation Report supports those claims. However, although lab results are vital to knowing the real story they are only part of that story. We also wanted to hear directly from IT about Scale in the real world of the mid-sized and SMB data center.

We undertook a Field Report project where we spoke at length with eight Scale customers. This report details our findings around the top common points we found throughout eight different environments: exceptional simplicity, excellent support, clear value, painless scalability, and high availability – all at a low price. These key features make a hyperconverged platform a reality for SMB and mid-market virtualization customers. 

Publish date: 01/05/15
Profiles/Reports

Scale Computing HC3: A Look at a Hyperconverged Appliance

Consolidation and enhanced management enabled by virtualization has revolutionized the practice of IT around the world over the past few years. By abstracting compute from the underlying hardware systems, and enabling oversubscription of physical systems by virtual workloads, IT has been able to pack more systems into the data center than before. Moreover, for the first time in seemingly decades, IT has also taken a serious leap ahead in management, as this same virtual infrastructure has wrapped the virtualized workload with better capabilities than ever before - tools like increased visibility, fast provisioning, enhanced cloning, and better data protection. The net result has been a serious increase in overall IT efficiency.

But not all is love and roses with the virtual infrastructure. In the face of serious benefits and consequent rampant adoption, virtualization continues to advance and bring about more capability. All too often, an increase in capability has come at the cost of complexity. Virtualization now promises to do everything from serving up compute instances, to providing network infrastructure and network security, to enabling private clouds. 

For certain, much of this complexity exists between the individual physical infrastructures that IT must touch, and the simultaneous duplication that virtualization often brings into the picture. Virtual and physical networks must now be integrated, the relationship between virtual and physical servers must be tracked, and the administrator can barely answer with certainty whether key storage functions, like snapshots, should be managed on physical storage systems or in the virtual infrastructure.

Scale Computing, an early pioneer in HyperConverged solutions, has released multiple versions of HC3 appliances and now includes the 6th generation of Scale’s HyperCore Operating System. Scale Computing continues to push the boundary in regards to simplicity, value and availability that many SMB IT departments everywhere have come to rely on.  HC3 is an integration of storage and virtualized compute within a scale-out building block architecture that couples all of the elements of a virtual data center together inside a hyperconverged appliance. The result is a system that is simple to use and does away with much of the complexity associated with virtualization in the data center. By virtualizing and intermingling compute and storage inside a system that is designed for scale-out, HC3 does away with the need to manage virtual networks, assemble complex compute clusters, provision and manage storage, and a bevy of other day to day administrative tasks. Provisioning additional resources - any resource - becomes one-click-easy, and adding more physical resources as the business grows is reduced to a simple 2-minute exercise.

While this sounds compelling on the surface, Taneja Group recently turned our Technology Validation service - our hands-on lab service - to the task of evaluating whether Scale Computing's HC3 could deliver on these promises in the real world. For this task, we put an HC3 cluster through the paces to see how well it deployed, how it held up under use, and what special features it delivered that might go beyond the features found in traditional integrations of discreet compute and storage systems.

While we did touch upon whether Scale's architecture could scale performance as well as capacity, we focused our testing upon how the seamless integration of storage and compute within HC3 tackles key complexity challenges in the traditional virtual infrastructure.

As it turns out, HC3 is a far different system than the traditional compute and storage systems that we've looked at before. HC3's combination of compute and storage takes place within a scale-out paradigm, where adding more resources is simply a matter of adding additional nodes to a cluster. This immediately brings on more storage and compute resources, and makes adapting and growing the IT infrastructure a no-brainer exercise. On top of this adaptability, virtual machines (VMs) can run on any of the nodes, without any complex external networking. This delivers seamless utilization of all datacenter resources, in a dense and power efficient footprint, while significantly enhancing storage performance.

Meanwhile, within an HC3 cluster, these capabilities are all delivered on top of a uniquely robust system architecture that can tolerate any failure - from a disk to an entire cluster node - and guarantee a level of availability seldom seen by mid-sized customers. Moreover, that uniquely robust, clustered, scale-out architecture can also intermix different generation of nodes in a way that will put an end to painful upgrades by reducing them to simply decommissioning old nodes as new ones are introduced.

HC3’s flexibility, ease of deployment, robustness and a management interface is the simplest and easiest to use that we have seen. This makes HC3 a disruptive game changer for SMB and SME businesses. HC3 stands to banish complex IT infrastructure deployment, permanently alter on-going operational costs, and take application availability to a new level. With those capabilities in focus, single bottom-line observations don’t do HC3 justice. In our assessment, HC3 may take as little as 1/10th the effort to setup and install as traditional infrastructure, 1/4th the effort to configure and deploy a virtual machine (VM) versus doing so using traditional infrastructure, and can banish the planning, performance troubleshooting, and reconfiguration exercises that can consume as much as 25-50% of an IT administrator’s time. HC3 is about delivering on all of these promises simultaneously, and with the additional features we'll discuss, transforming the way SMB/SME IT is done.

Publish date: 09/30/15
Profiles/Reports

Business Continuity Best Practices for SMB

Virtualization’s biggest driver is big savings: slashing expenditures on servers, licenses, management, and energy. Another major benefit is the increased ease of disaster recovery and business continuity (DR/BC) in virtualized environments.

Note that disaster recovery and business continuity are closely aligned but not identical. We define disaster recovery as the process of restoring lost data, applications and systems following a profound data loss event, such as a natural disaster, a deliberate data breach or employee negligence. Business continuity takes DR a step further. BC’s goal is not only to recover the computing environment but also to recover them swiftly and with zero data loss. This is where recovery point objectives (RPO) and recovery time objectives (RTO) enter the picture, with IT assigning differing RPO and RTO strategies according to application priority.

DR/BC can be difficult to do well in data centers with traditional physical servers, particularly in SMB with limited IT budgets and generalist IT staff. Many of these servers are siloed with direct-attached storage and individual data protection processes. Mirroring and replication used to require one-to-one hardware correspondence and can be expensive, leading to a universal reliance on localized backup as data protection. In addition, small IT staffs do not always take the time to perfect their backup processes across disparate servers. Either they do not do it at all –rolling the dice and hoping there won’t be a disaster – or they slap backups on tape or USB drives and stick them on a shelf.

Virtualization can transform this environment into a much more efficient and protected data center. Backing up VMs from a handful of host servers is faster and less resource-intensive than backing up tens or hundreds of physical servers. And with scheduled replication, companies achieve faster backup and much improved recovery objectives.

However, many SMBs avoid virtualization. They cite factors such as cost, unfamiliarity with hypervisors, and added complexity. And they are not wrong: virtualization can introduce complexity, it can be expensive, and it can require familiarity with hypervisors. Virtualization cuts down on physical servers but is resource-intensive, especially as the virtualized environment grows. This means capital costs for high performance CPUs and storage. SMBs may also have to deal VM licensing and management costs, administrative burdens, and the challenge of protecting and replicating virtualized data on a strict budget.

For all its complexity and learning curve, is virtualization worth it for SMBs? Definitely. Its benefits far outweigh its problems, particularly its advantages for DR/BC. But for many SMBs, traditional virtualization is often too expensive and complex to warrant the effort. We believe that the answer is HyperConverged Infrastructure: HCI. Of HCI providers, Scale Computing is exceptionally attractive to the SMB. This paper will explain why. 

Publish date: 09/30/15
news

Scale Computing Radically Changes Price-Performance in the Datacenter with Fully Automated Flash

Latest HC3 Release Optimizes Hyperconvergence by Intelligently Moving Data Based on Workload Priority and Usage Patterns

  • Premiered: 05/03/16
  • Author: Taneja Group
  • Published: MarketWired
Topic(s): TBA Scale Computing TBA Datacenter TBA Automated Tiering TBA automated storage tiering TBA automated storage TBA Flash TBA SSD TBA HC3 TBA hyperconverged TBA hyperconvergence TBA Optimization TBA HC TBA hybrid storage TBA Storage TBA cluster TBA Performance TBA Virtualization TBA high availability TBA Arun Taneja TBA Virtual Machine TBA VM TBA SAN TBA VSA TBA Virtual storage TBA virtual storage appliance
news

Scale Computing HC3 hyper-convergence dips below $25,000

Hyper-converged SMB specialist Scale Computing adds a new low-end hybrid flash appliance at $24,500 for a three-node cluster. Can it hold off Nutanix?

  • Premiered: 06/15/16
  • Author: Taneja Group
  • Published: TechTarget: Search Converged IT
Topic(s): TBA hyper-converged TBA SMB TBA hyperconverged TBA hyperconvergence TBA hyper-convergence TBA Scale Computing TBA Nutanix TBA Flash TBA SSD TBA hybrid flash TBA cluster TBA HC3 TBA Storage TBA Compute TBA Networking TBA Virtualization TBA SAN TBA KVM TBA SimpliVity TBA Springpath TBA Performance TBA Arun Taneja