Taneja Group | Exadata
Join Newsletter
Forgot
password?
Register
Trusted Business Advisors, Expert Technology Analysts

Items Tagged: Exadata

news

New Oracle ZFS Storage Appliance adds speed, encryption

Oracle's new high-end ZFS Storage Appliance features improved performance and power, 3 TB DRAM, pluggable data analytics and data-at-rest encryption.

  • Premiered: 12/02/14
  • Author: Taneja Group
  • Published: Tech Target: Search Storage
Topic(s): TBA Oracle TBA Oracle ZFS TBA ZFS TBA Encryption TBA Storage TBA analytics TBA NAS TBA Performance TBA Database TBA Optimization TBA Infrastructure TBA Flash TBA SSD TBA EMC TBA NetApp TBA Exadata TBA hybrid storage TBA LUN
Profiles/Reports

Enterprise Flash - Scalable, Smart, and Economical

There is a serious re-hosting effort going on in data center storage as flash-filled systems replace large arrays of older spinning disks for tier 1 apps. Naturally as costs drop and the performance advantages of flash-accelerated IO services become irresistible, they also begin pulling in a widening circle of applications with varying QoS needs. Yet this extension leads to a wasteful tug-of-war between high-end flash only systems that can’t effectively serve a wide variety of application workloads and so-called hybrid solutions originally architected for HDDs that are often challenged to provide the highest performance required by those tier 1 applications.

Someday in its purest form all-flash storage theoretically could drop in price enough to outright replace all other storage tiers even at the largest capacities, although that is certainly not true today. Here at Taneja Group we think storage tiering will always offer a better way to deliver varying levels of QoS by balancing the latest in performance advances appropriately with the most efficient capacities. In any case, the best enterprise storage solutions today need to offer a range of storage tiers, often even when catering to a single application’s varying storage needs.

There are many entrants in the flash storage market, with the big vendors now rolling out enterprise solutions upgraded for flash. Unfortunately many of these systems are shallow retreads of older architectures, perhaps souped-up a bit to better handle some hybrid flash acceleration but not able to take full advantage of it. Or they are new dedicated flash-only point products with big price tags, immature or minimal data services, and limited ability to scale out or serve a wider set of data center QoS needs.

Oracle saw an opportunity for a new type of cost-effective flash-speed storage system that could meet the varied QoS needs of multiple enterprise data center applications – in other words, to take flash storage into the mainstream of the data center. Oracle decided they had enough storage chops (from Exadata, ZFS, Pillar, Sun, etc.) to design and build a “flash-first” enterprise system intended to take full advantage of flash as a performance tier, but also incorporate other storage tiers naturally including slower “capacity” flash, performance HDD, and capacity HDD. Tiering by itself isn’t a new thing – all the hybrid solutions do it and there are other vendor solutions that were designed for tiering – but Oracle built the FS1 Flash Storage System from the fast “flash” tier down, not by adding flash to a slower or existing HDD-based architecture working “upwards.” This required designing intelligent automated management to take advantage of flash for performance while leveraging HDD to balance out cost. This new architecture has internal communication links dedicated to flash media with separate IO paths for HDDs, unlike traditional hybrids that might rely solely on their older, standard HDD-era architectures that can internally constrain high-performance flash access.

Oracle FS1 is a highly engineered SAN storage system with key capabilities that set it apart from other all-flash storage systems, including built in QoS management that incorporates business priorities, best-practices provisioning, and a storage alignment capability that is application aware – for Oracle Database naturally, but that can also address a growing body of other key enterprise applications (such as Oracle JD Edwards, PeopleSoft, Siebel, MS Exchange/SQL Server, and SAP) – and a “service provider” capability to carve out multi-tenant virtual storage “domains” while online that are actually enforced at the hardware partitioning level for top data security isolation.

In this report, we’ll dive in and examine some of the great new capabilities of the Oracle FS1. We’ll look at what really sets it apart from the competition in terms of its QoS, auto-tiering, co-engineering with Oracle Database and applications, delivered performance, capacity scaling and optimization, enterprise availability, and OPEX reducing features, all at a competitive price point that will challenge the rest of the increasingly flash-centric market.

Publish date: 02/02/15
Profiles/Reports

Full Database Protection Without the Full Backup Plan: Oracle's Cloud-Scaled Zero Data Loss Recovery

Today’s tidal wave of big data isn’t just made up of loose unstructured documents – huge data growth is happening everywhere including in high-value structured datasets kept in databases like Oracle Database 12c. This data is any company’s most valuable core data that powers most key business applications – and it’s growing fast! According to Oracle, in 5 years (by 2020) most enterprises expect 50x data growth. As their scope and coverage grow, these key databases inherently become even more critical to our businesses. At the same time, the sheer number of database-driven applications and users is also multiplying – and they increasingly need to be online, globally, 24 x 7. Which all leads to the big burning question: How can we possibly protect all this critical data, data we depend on more and more even as it grows, all the time?

We just can’t keep taking more time out of the 24-hour day for longer and larger database backups. The traditional batch window backup approach is already often beyond practical limits and its problems are only getting worse with data growth – missed backup windows, increased performance degradation, unavailability, fragility, risk and cost. It’s now time for a new data protection approach that can do away with the idea of batch window backups, yet still provide immediate backup copies to recover from failures, corruption, and other disasters.

Oracle has stepped up in a big way, and marshaling expertise and technologies from across their engineered systems portfolio, has developed a new Zero Data Loss Recovery Appliance. Note the very intentional name that is focused on total recoverability – the Recovery Appliance is definitely not just another backup target. This new appliance eliminates the pains and risks of the full database backup window approach completely through a highly engineered continuous data protection solution for Oracle databases. It is now possible to immediately recover any database to any point in time desired, as the Recovery Appliance provides “virtual” full backups on demand and can scale to protect thousands of databases and petabytes of capacity. In fact, it offloads backup processes from production database servers which can increase performance in Oracle environments typically by  25%. Adopting this new backup and recovery solution will actually give CPU cycles back to the business.

In this report, we’ll briefly review why conventional data protection approaches based on the backup window are fast becoming obsolete. Then we’ll look into how Oracle has designed the new Recovery Appliance to provide a unique approach to ensuring data protection in real-time, at scale, for thousands of databases and PBs of data. We’ll see how zero data loss, incremental forever backups, continuous validation, and other innovations have completely changed the game of database data protection. For the first time there is now a real and practical way to fully protect a global corporation’s databases—on-premise and in the cloud—even in the face of today’s tremendous big data growth.

Publish date: 12/22/15