Join Newsletter
Forgot
password?
Register
Trusted Business Advisors, Expert Technology Analysts

Research Areas

Software Defined/Virtualized Infrastructure

Includes Software-Defined Infrastructure (compute, storage and networking), Virtual Infrastructure technologies (server virtualization, desktop virtualization, I/O virtualization), and the interplay between these technologies and traditional storage. Covers different types of Software-Defined Storage, such as Scale-out NAS, in depth.

Taneja Group has been at the forefront of assessing and characterizing virtualization and software-defined infrastructure technologies since they began to emerge in the early 2000’s. Virtualization has caused one of the most disruptive technology shifts in data center infrastructure in the last 15 years. While its basic principles may not be new, virtualization has never been so widespread, nor has it been applied to as many platforms as it is in today. Taneja Group analysts combine expert knowledge of server and storage virtualization with keen insight into their impact on all aspects of IT operations and management to give our clients the research and analysis required to take advantage of this “virtual evolution.” We focus on the interplay of server and client virtualization technologies with storage, and study the impact on performance, security and management of the IT infrastructure. Our virtualization practice covers all virtual infrastructure components: server virtualization/hypervisors, desktop/client virtualization, storage virtualization, and network and I/O virtualization.

Page 1 of 22 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›
Report

Qumulo Tackles the Machine Data Challenge: Six Customers Explain How

We are moving into a new era of data storage. The traditional storage infrastructure that we know (and do not necessarily love) was designed to process and store input from human beings. People input emails, word processing documents and spreadsheets. They created databases and recorded business transactions. Data was stored on tape, workstation hard drives, and over the LAN.

In the second stage of data storage development, humans still produced most content but there was more and more of it, and file sizes got larger and larger. Video and audio, digital imaging, websites streaming entertainment content to millions of users; and no end to data growth. Storage capacity grew to encompass large data volumes and flash became more common in hybrid and all-flash storage systems.

Today, the storage environment has undergone another major change. The major content producers are no longer people, but machines. Storing and processing machine data offers tremendous opportunities: Seismic and weather sensors that may lead to meaningful disaster warnings. Social network diagnostics that display hard evidence of terrorist activity. Connected cars that could slash automotive fatalities. Research breakthroughs around the human brain thanks to advances in microscopy.

However, building storage systems that can store raw machine data and process it is not for the faint of heart. The best solution today is massively scale-out, general purpose NAS. This type of storage system has a single namespace capable of storing billions of differently sized files, linearly scales performance and capacity, and offers data-awareness and real-time analytics using extended metadata.

There are a very few vendors in the world today who offer this solution. One of them is Qumulo. Qumulo’s mission is to provide high volume storage to business and scientific environments that produce massive volumes of machine data.

To gauge how well Qumulo works in the real world of big data, we spoke with six customers from life sciences, media and entertainment, telco/cable/satellite, higher education and the automotive industries. Each customer deals with massive machine-generated data and uses Qumulo to store, manage, and curate mission-critical data volumes 24x7. Customers cited five major benefits to Qumulo: massive scalability, high performance, data-awareness and analytics, extreme reliability, and top-flight customer support.

Read on to see how Qumulo supports large-scale data storage and processing in these mission-critical, intensive machine data environments.

Publish date: 10/26/16
Free Reports

For Lowest TCO and Maximum Agility Choose the VMware Cloud Foundation Hybrid SDDC Platform

The race is on at full speed.  What race?  The race to bring public cloud agility and economics to a data center near you. Ever since the first integrated systems came onto the scene in 2010, vendors have been furiously engineering solutions to make on-premises infrastructure as cost effective and as easy to use as the public cloud, while also providing the security, availability, and control that enterprises demand. Fundamentally, two main architectures have evolved within the race to modernize data centers that will create a foundation enabling fully private and hybrid clouds. The first approach uses traditional compute, storage, and networking infrastructure components (traditional 3-tier) overlaid with varying degrees of virtualization and management software. The second more recent approach is to build a fully virtualized data center using industry standard servers and networking and then layer on top of that a full suite of software-based compute, network, and storage virtualization with management software. This approach is often termed a Software-Defined Data Center (SDDC).

The goal of an SDDC is to extend virtualization techniques across the entire data center to enable the abstraction, pooling, and automation of all data center resources. This would allow a business to dynamically reallocate any part of the infrastructure for various workload requirements without forklifting hardware or rewiring. VMware has taken SDDC to a new level with VMware Cloud Foundation.  VMware Cloud Foundation is the only unified SDDC platform for the hybrid cloud, which brings together VMware’s compute, storage, and network virtualization into a natively integrated stack that can be deployed on-premises or run as a service from the public cloud. It establishes a common cloud infrastructure foundation that gives customers a unified and consistent operational model across the private and public cloud.

VMware Cloud Foundation delivers an industry-leading SDDC cloud infrastructure by combining VMware’s highly scalable hyper-converged software (vSphere and VSAN) with the industry leading network virtualization platform, NSX. VMware Cloud Foundation comes with unique lifecycle management capabilities (SDDC Manager) that eliminate the overhead of system operations of the cloud infrastructure stack by automating day 0 to day 2 processes such as bring-up, configuration, workload provisioning, and patching/upgrades. As a result, customers can significantly shorten application time to market, boost cloud admin productivity, reduce risk, and lower TCO.  Customers consume VMware Cloud Foundation software in three ways: factory pre-loaded on integrated systems (VxRack 1000 SDDC); deployed on top qualified Ready Nodes from HPE, QCT, Fujitsu, and others in the future, with qualified networking; and run as a service from the public cloud through IBM, vCAN partners, vCloud Air, and more to come.

In this comparative study, Taneja Group performed an in-depth analysis of VMware Cloud Foundation deployed on qualified Ready Nodes and qualified networking versus several traditional 3-tier converged infrastructure (CI) integrated systems and traditional 3-tier do-it-yourself (DIY) systems. We analyzed the capabilities and contrasted key functional differences driven by the various architectural approaches. In addition, we evaluated the key CapEx and OpEx TCO cost components.  Taneja Group configured each traditional 3-tier system's hardware capacity to be as close as possible to the VMware Cloud Foundation qualified hardware capacity.  Further, since none of the 3-tier systems had a fully integrated SDDC software stack, Taneja Group added the missing SDDC software, making it as close as possible to the VMware Cloud Foundation software stack.  The quantitative comparative results from the traditional 3-tier DIY and CI systems were averaged together into one scenario because the hardware and software components are very similar. 

Our analysis concluded that both types of solutions are more than capable of handling a variety of virtualized workload requirements. However, VMware Cloud Foundation has demonstrated a new level of ease-of-use due to its modular scale-out architecture, native integration, and automatic lifecycle management, giving it a strong value proposition when building out modern next generation data centers.  The following are the five key attributes that stood out during the analysis:

  • Native Integration of the SDDC:  VMware Cloud Foundation natively integrates vSphere, Virtual SAN (VSAN), and NSX network virtualization.
  • Simplest operational experience: VMware SDDC Manager automates the life-cycle of the SDDC stack including bring up, configuration, workload provisioning, and patches/upgrades.
  •  
  • Isolated workload domains: VMware Cloud Foundation provides unique administrator tools to flexibly provision subsets of the infrastructure for multi-tenant isolation and security.
  • Modular linear scalability: VMware Cloud Foundation employs an architecture in which capacity can be scaled by the HCI node, by the rack, or by multiple racks. 
  • Seamless Hybrid Cloud: Deploy VMware Cloud Foundation for private cloud and consume on public clouds to create a seamless hybrid cloud with a consistent operational experience.

Taneja Group’s in-depth analysis indicates that VMware Cloud Foundation will enable enterprises to achieve significant cost savings. Hyper-converged infrastructure, used by many web-scale service providers, with natively integrated SDDC software significantly reduced server, storage, and networking costs.  This hardware cost saving more than offset the incremental SDDC software costs needed to deliver the storage and networking capability that typically is provided in hardware from best of breed traditional 3-tier components. In this study, we measured the upfront CapEx and 3 years of support costs for the hardware and software components needed to build out a VMware Cloud Foundation private cloud on qualified Ready Nodes.  In addition, Taneja Group validated a model that demonstrates the labor and time OpEx savings that can be achieved through the use of integrated end-to-end automatic lifecycle management in the VMware SDDC Manager software.

 

By investing in VMware Cloud Foundation, businesses can be assured that their data center infrastructure can be easily consumed, scaled, managed, upgraded and enhanced to provide the best private cloud at the lowest cost. Using a pre-engineered modular, scale-out approach to building at web-scale means infrastructure is added in hours, not days, and businesses can be assured that adding infrastructure scales linearly without complexity.  VMware Cloud Foundation is the only platform that provides a natively integrated unified SDDC platform for the hybrid cloud with end-to-end management and with the flexibility to provision a wide variety of workloads at the push of a button.

In summary, VMware Cloud Foundation enables at least five unparalleled capabilities, generates a 45% lower 3-year TCO than the alternative traditional 3-tier approaches, and delivers a tremendous value proposition when building out a modern hybrid SDDC platform. Before blindly going down the traditional infrastructure approach, companies should take a close look at VMware Cloud Foundation, a unified SDDC platform for the hybrid cloud.

Publish date: 10/17/16
Report

The Modern Data-Center: Why Nutanix Customers are Replacing Their NetApp Storage

Several Nutanix customers shared with Taneja Group why they switched from traditional NetApp storage to the hyperconverged Nutanix platform. Each customer talked about the value of hyperconvergence versus a traditional server/networking/storage stack, and the specific benefits of Nutanix in mission-critical production environments.

Hyperconverged systems are a popular alternative to traditional computing architectures that are built with separate compute, storage, and networking components. Nutanix turns this complex environment into an efficient, software-based infrastructure where hypervisor, compute, storage, networking, and data services run on scalable nodes that seamlessly scale across massive virtual environments.  

The customers we spoke with came from very different industries, but all of them faced major technology refreshes for legacy servers and NetApp storage. Each decided that hyperconvergence was the right answer, and each chose the Nutanix hyperconvergence platform for its major benefits including scalability, simplicity, value, performance, and support. The single key achievement running through all these benefits is “Ease of Everything”: ease of scaling, ease of management, ease of realizing value, ease of performance, and ease of upgrades and support. Nutanix simply works across small clusters and large, single and multiple datacenters, specialist or generalist IT, and different hypervisors.

The datacenter is not static. Huge data growth and increasing complexity are motivating IT directors from every industry to invest in scalable hyperconvergence. Given Nutanix benefits across the board, these directors can confidently adopt Nutanix to transform their data-centers, just as these NetApp customers did.

Publish date: 03/31/16
Report

The Hyperconverged Data Center: Nutanix Customers Explain Why They Replaced Their EMC SANS

Taneja Group spoke with several Nutanix customers in order to understand why they switched from EMC storage to the Nutanix platform. All of the respondent’s articulated key architectural benefits of hyperconvergence versus a traditional 3-tier solutions. In addition, specific Nutanix features for mission-critical production environments were often cited.

Hyperconverged systems have become a mainstream alternative to traditional 3-tier architecture consisting of separate compute, storage and networking products. Nutanix collapses this complex environment into software-based infrastructure optimized for virtual environments. Hypervisor, compute, storage, networking, and data services run on scalable nodes that seamlessly scale across massive virtual assets. Hyperconvergence offers a key value proposition over 3-tier architecture:  instead of deploying, managing and integrating separate components – storage, servers, networking, data services, and hypervisors – these components are combined into a modular high performance system.

The customers we interviewed operate in very different industries. In common, they all maintained data centers undergoing fundamental changes, typically involving an opportunity to refresh some portion of their 3-tier infrastructure. This enabled the evaluation of hyperconvergence in supporting those changes. Customers interviewed found that Nutanix hyperconvergence delivered benefits in the areas of scalability, simplicity, value, performance, and support. If we could use one phrase to explain why Nutanix’ is winning over EMC customers in the enterprise market it would be “Ease of Everything.” Nutanix works, and works consistently with small and large clusters, in single and multiple datacenters, with specialist or generalist IT support, and across hypervisors.

The five generations of Nutanix products span many years of product innovation. Web-scale architecture has been the key to Nutanix platform’s enterprise capable performance, simplicity and scalability. Building technology like this requires years of innovation and focus and is not an add-on for existing products and architectures.

The modern data center is quickly changing. Extreme data growth and complexity are driving data center directors toward innovative technology that will grow with them. Given the benefits of Nutanix web-scale architecture – and the Ease of Everything – data center directors can confidently adopt Nutanix as their partner in data center transformation just as the following EMC customers did.

Publish date: 03/31/16
Report

Nutanix Versus VCE: Web-Scale Versus Converged Infrastructure in the Real World

This Field Report was created by Taneja Group for Nutanix in late 2014 with updates in 2015. The Taneja Group analyzed the experiences of seven Nutanix Xtreme Computing Platform customers and seven Virtual Computing Environment (VCE) Vblock customers. We did not ‘cherry-pick’ customers for dissatisfaction, delight, or specific use case; we were interested in typical customers’ honest reactions.

As we talked in detail to these customers, we kept seeing the same patterns: 1) VCE users were interested in converged systems; and 2) they chose VCE because VCE partners Cisco, EMC, and/or VMware were embedded in their IT relationships and sales. The VCE process had the advantage of vendor familiarity, but it came at a price: high capital expense, infrastructure and management complexity, expensive support contracts, and concerns over the long-term viability of the VCE partnership (see an opinion of the DELL/EMC merger at end of this document). VCE customers typically did not research other options for converged infrastructure prior to deploying the VCE Vblock solution.

In contrast, Nutanix users researched several convergence and hyperconvergence vendors to determine the best possible fit. Nutanix’ advanced web-scale framework gave them simplified architecture and management, reasonable acquisition and operating costs, and considerably faster time to value.

Our conclusion, based on the amount of time and effort spent by the teams responsible for managing converged infrastructure, is that VCE Vblock deployments represent an improvement over traditional architectures, but Nutanix hyperconvergence – especially with its web-scale architecture – is an big improvement over VCE.

This Field Report will compare customer experiences with Nutanix hyperconverged, web-scale infrastructure to VCE Vblock in real-world environments. 

Publish date: 01/14/16
Profile

HyperConverged Infrastructure Powered by Pivot3: Benefits of a More Efficient HCI Architecture

Virtualization has matured and become widely adopted in the enterprise market. HyperConverged Infrastructure (HCI), with virtualization at its core, is taking the market by storm, enabling virtualization for businesses of all sizes. The success of these technologies has been driven by an insatiable desire to make IT simpler, faster, and more efficient. IT can no longer afford the time and effort required to create custom infrastructure from best-of-breed DIY components.

With HCI, the traditional three-tier architecture has been collapsed into a single system that is purpose-built for virtualization. In these solutions, the hypervisor, compute, storage, and advanced data services are integrated into an x86 industry-standard building block. The immense success of this approach has led to increased competition in this space and the customers are required to sort through the various offerings, analyzing key attributes to determine which are significant.

One of these competing vendors, Pivot3, was founded in 2002 and has been in the HCI market since 2008, well before the term HyperConverged was used. For many years, Pivot3’s vSTAC architecture has provided the most efficient scale-out Software-Defined Storage (SDS) system available on the market. This efficiency is attributed to three design innovations. The first is their extremely efficient and reliable erasure coding technology called Scalar Erasure Coding. Conversely, many leading HCI implementations use replication-based redundancy techniques which are heavy on storage capacity utilization. Scalar Erasure Coding from Pivot3 can deliver significant capacity savings depending on the level of drive protection selected. The second innovation is Pivot3’s Global Hyperconvergence which creates a cross-cluster virtual SAN, the HyperSAN: in case of appliance failure, a VM migrates to another node and continues operations without the need to divert compute power to copy data over to that node. The third innovation has been a reduction in CPU overhead needed to implement the SDS features and other VM centric management tasks. Implementation of the HCI software uses the same CPU complex as business applications, this additional usage is referred to as the HCI overhead tax. HCI overhead tax is important since the licensing cost for many applications and infrastructure software are based on a per CPU basis. Even with today’s ever- increasing cores per CPU there still can be significant cost saving by keeping the HCI overhead tax low.

The Pivot3 family of HCI products delivering high data efficiency with a very low overhead are an ideal solution for storage-centric business workload environments where storage costs and reliability are critical success factors. One example of this is a VDI implementation where cost per seat determines success. Other examples would be capacity-centric workloads such as big data or video surveillance that could benefit from a Pivot3 HCI approach with leading storage capacity and reliability. In this paper we compare Pivot3 with other leading HCI architectures. We utilized data extracted from the alternative HCI vendor’s reference architectures for VDI implementations. Using real world examples, we have demonstrated that with other solutions, users must purchase up to 136% more raw storage capacity and up to 59% more total CPU cores than are required when using equivalent Pivot3 products. These impressive results can lead to significant costs savings. 

Publish date: 12/10/15
Page 1 of 22 pages  1 2 3 >  Last ›