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Profile

When Comparing Cloud Alternatives, For the Best TCO Leverage VMware Cloud Foundation

In this paper we examine the relative costs and other advantages of four different cloud infrastructure approaches, two based on private or on-premises clouds and two on public clouds. These public and private approaches can in turn be combined to create a hybrid cloud deployment. The objective is to enable businesses to evaluate which cloud approach makes the most sense for them, based on differences in TCO and other relevant factors.

Public clouds are here to stay, given their large and growing adoption by businesses and consumers alike. Now well over a decade since AWS first launched its infrastructure-as-a-service offerings, public clouds have become a popular deployment choice for both new and legacy business applications. Based on Taneja Group research, nearly every business is now running at least some of its use cases and applications in one or more public clouds. Clouds offer customers greater agility and near-infinite scalability, in addition to a flexible pay-as-you-go consumption model.

However, a large majority of businesses have decided they cannot rely on public clouds alone to satisfy their IT needs. Instead, they see hybrid clouds as a better architectural choice, enabling them to realize all the advantages of a public cloud along with broader use case support and a more flexible deployment model. More than two-thirds of IT professionals who participated in two recent Taneja Group research studies favor hybrid clouds as their long-term architecture.

For the on-premises or private cloud component of a hybrid cloud, the majority of users are starting with VMware technology and typically use two different approaches: a traditional, integrated 3-tier architecture commonly called Converged Infrastructure (CI); or a fully software-defined approach based on Hyperconverged Infrastructure (HCI). The 3-tier, CI approach utilizes loosely integrated compute, storage and networking resources, while the easiest and most comprehensive approach is based on VMware Cloud Foundation, a software-defined data center platform. Our analysis demonstrates that the software-defined VMware Cloud Foundation approach provides a simpler, more cost-effective approach to building on-premises or private cloud infrastructure.

Looking to the public cloud, businesses have a choice of whether to move all or just a subset of their on-premises workloads to the public cloud, and either run them there permanently or in hybrid fashion. We have analyzed the relative costs and advantages of two major ways to migrate and run workloads in the public cloud: moving on-premises workloads to a native public cloud infrastructure, such as native Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure or Google Cloud Platform; or moving them to a VMware Cloud Foundation-based public cloud, such as VMware Cloud on AWS or VMware Cloud Foundation offered as a service by one of the VMware Cloud Provider Program (VCPP) partners. As we’ll see, moving to a native public cloud infrastructure requires often significant upfront refactoring and migration effort, which gives the path to a VMware Cloud Foundation-based public cloud a major cost advantage.

Based on our in-depth costing and qualitative analysis of the two private and two public cloud approaches, we found that clouds based on VMware Cloud Foundation technology offer the lowest TCO over a three-year period. VMware Cloud Foundation-based clouds minimize risk by starting with proven and widely deployed VMware technology on premises and enabling full application compatibility and workload portability between your on-premises environment and your choice of one or more VMware-compatible public clouds. VMware Cloud Foundation-enabled clouds will help you to optimize your path to a hybrid cloud deployment.

Publish date: 05/21/19
Profile

HPE 3PAR Performance Insights: Bringing InfoSight Analytics to the Edge

In an era in which every tech company claims to have an AI offering, HPE InfoSight stands out as the genuine article. HPE InfoSight is a best-in-class AI solution that uses cloud-based machine learning to provide global insights into the status and health of infrastructure, removing much of the management burden and helping customers to solve some of their most challenging IT problems. In particular, HPE InfoSight delivers cross-stack insights into a storage array’s health, configuration, capacity and performance based on near-real time analytics and the knowledge gained from a vast treasure trove of field data collected over many years.

Among a seemingly endless set of over-hyped AI solutions, HPE InfoSight is delivering remarkable results and significantly enriching the customer experience. The solution has reduced support incidents across more than 50,000 connected HPE 3PAR storage systems by 85%, while lowering operating expenses by nearly 80%. With its unmatched track record, HPE InfoSight has become the leader in AI-driven operations for the Hybrid Cloud and an essential asset for HPE 3PAR customers.

Now InfoSight technology is being incorporated into a new solution at the edge, which is enabling HPE 3PAR customers to better understand, anticipate and improve array performance. As we’ll see, HPE Performance Insights for 3PAR Storage takes an innovative approach to helping IT managers track storage performance and deliver it when and where it’s needed most, based on the power and intelligence of InfoSight’s AI and machine learning technologies.

Publish date: 11/30/18
Report

HPE RMC 6.0: Extending Beyond Copy Data Management

If you’ve worked in IT, you know that a large percentage of your company’s data has been copied at least once, and often multiple times, to meet the needs of various use cases. Whether it’s backup copies for data protection, archival copies for compliance, or clones for test/dev or analytics, any particular set of data is likely to have spawned one or more copies. While these copies are nearly always made for a good reason, in many organizations they have spiraled out of control, creating a copy data sprawl that is tough for IT to get its arms around, let alone manage. As copies of data have proliferated, so have the pain points of greater storage complexity, footprint and cost. The performance of production databases also suffers as copies are made for secondary applications.

It is these very issues that copy data management (CDM) is designed to address. CDM solutions focus on eliminating unnecessary duplication of production data to reduce storage consumption, generally through the use of data virtualization and data reduction technologies. The results can be compelling. Nearly one-third of the companies that Taneja Group recently surveyed have either adopted CDM solutions or are actively evaluating them, looking to achieve benefits such as reduced storage costs, faster data access, and better data visibility and compliance.

But while first-generation CDM offerings have proven helpful, they are not keeping up with the demands of new technologies and user requirements. In particular, Flash and Cloud bring new data management opportunities and challenges that cannot be addressed by traditional CDM solutions. User needs and expectations for CDM are also expanding, moving beyond just policy-based snapshot management among homogeneous arrays.

As we’ve learned in our research, next-gen CDM must meet a new set of user needs driven by Flash and Cloud innovations, including support for heterogeneous arrays, greater but less hands-on control of copies based on intelligent policy-based automation, and coverage of new use cases across the data lifecycle, such as test/dev, reporting and analytics. Customers are also looking for integrated solutions that combine CDM with data protection and other secondary storage functions.

As we’ll see, HPE Recovery Manager Central (RMC) 6.0 provides all these capabilities and more. In fact, we’ll argue that the updated RMC 6.0 offering has helped to make HPE a leader in the data management space, streamlining costs and enriching the experience of HPE customers while still delivering on the backup and recovery features that RMC is well known for.

Publish date: 10/16/18
Free Reports

Enterprises Realize Significant Value with Dell EMC Integrated DP for Converged Infrastructure

We talked to four organizations that have implemented Dell EMC Integrated Data Protection for Converged Infrastructure. The term Converged Infrastructure (CI) refers to an IT solution that groups storage, memory, compute, and networking components into a single, optimized package. When organizations evaluated Dell EMC Integrated Data Protection for CI, a key priority was improving data backup and recovery. To lower their operational costs, they also recognized the importance of having CI that would enable turnkey data protection and reduce their implementation, maintenance, and support costs, as well as improve reliability.

Prior to implementing Dell EMC Integrated Data Protection for CI, organizations we interviewed said they had significant cost, risk, and delay with implementations and upgrades. Several factors contributed to these issues including extensive time spent testing and doing research, compatibility and integration issues, and dealing with multiple support organizations.

All the companies we talked to also wanted better data protection. Many companies were struggling with slow backup speeds, poor storage efficiency, insufficient recovery times, and high operational overhead. To address these problems, companies needed better backup performance, instant data recovery, simplified management, and policy driven automation for both backup and data recovery.

Companies also wanted better vendor support, and they shared a common goal of placing “one-call” for all questions and issues they might have with any aspect of the solution. Success criteria included fast, no-hassle resolution and eliminating finger pointing between software and hardware vendors. Also expressed during the interviews, was the desire to have a vendor that would proactively monitor their system and a team that would partner with them and proactively address their ongoing needs.

Dell EMC customers found that the key to addressing their needs is Dell EMC’s CI, Vblock and VxBlock Systems (now consolidated as one turnkey product called VxBlock System 1000). Dell EMC is a CI pioneer and with Dell EMC Integrated Data Protection for CI, Dell EMC has gone a step further and delivered enterprise-class data protection that is tightly integrated with VxBlock Systems. The result is all-in-one, high performance, highly reliable data protection that is integrated with VxBlock Systems during manufacturing, pre-tested, pre-validated, and fully supported by a single vendor.

It’s an amazing value proposition. There are no point products, therefore less complexity and no compatibility issues. Every company we talked to stated that Dell EMC has exceeded their expectations, and helped them at every phase of their journey from implementation to support.

Publish date: 09/28/18
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